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Staying Motivated to Exercise

Find the right exercise routine that works best for you, makes you feel great, and inspired to get healthier!

Photos depict models, not actual patients or healthcare professionals.

Photos depict models, not actual patients or healthcare professionals.

If you are like most people

If you're like most people, you think exercise is boring. Or that you're not athletic enough to exercise. Maybe you think you'll hurt yourself if you do. So you don't exercise as much as you should.

Remember to talk to your healthcare professional before beginning or changing an exercise program.

If you have diabetes, exercise may increase your risk for low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) during or after exercise.1
Speak with your healthcare professional if you experience hypoglycemia.

Don't sweat it!

Stay focused, take it slow, and be careful if you're starting to
exercise for the first time.

Below are some tips on how to incorporate exercise into your daily life to keep you motivated, on track, and moving forward! Talk to your doctor before starting any exercise program.

Make exercise fun! Choose activities you'll enjoy. Rotate among several such as walking, swimming, and cycling. Work out with friends, relatives, or coworkers. Check out the cool new exercise class at your health club, or the sports league at your recreation center.

Exercise when you're energized. We all have times when we feel lazy. Plan physical activity for times of the day when you tend to feel energetic—not tired or unmotivated.

Schedule exercise like an important appointment. Block off times on your calendar for physical activity. Make sure your friends and family are aware of your commitment and that they know this is something you need to do for you.

Don't worry if you're not an athlete. You don't need great athletic ability to exercise. It's OK not to turn into a superstar athlete or bodybuilder. Simply focus on the positive changes you're making to your body. Take it slow and be careful if you're starting to exercise for the first time.

Feel your strength. Note how much stronger you feel after a workout. Feels great, right? Praise yourself for improving your strength and stamina, and making a commitment to fitness.

Start from the beginning. If you're nervous about injuring yourself, start by walking around your neighborhood. Try an exercise class for beginners. Or work one-on-one with a personal trainer who can help you learn exercise basics.

Set realistic goals. Don't promise yourself you're going to work out for an hour every day, then get disappointed with yourself when you don't. Stick with goals you can more easily achieve, then set bigger ones when your body is ready.

If you're uncomfortable exercising in front of others, try exercising at home. Consider investing in a stationary bicycle, treadmill, or other piece of home exercise equipment and put it somewhere that you'll use it.

Remember why you're exercising. Exercise can mean better cardiovascular health, weight loss, lower blood sugar and cholesterol levels, and much, much more. Never lose sight of that.

 

Consult with your doctor before choosing a goal weight and starting a new exercise program. If you have diabetes, exercise may increase your risk for low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) during or after exercise.1 Speak with your healthcare professional if you experience hypoglycemia.

Preventing exercise-related

Preventing exercise-related low blood sugar1

If you have diabetes, exercise may increase your sensitivity to insulin. This means you may be at risk for low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) during and after exercise.

Here are a couple tips to prevent exercise-related hypoglycemia2:
  • Check your blood sugar before and after exercising
  • Consider eating a light snack if you plan on exercising for longer than an hour
Speak with your healthcare professional if you experience hypoglycemia.

Make Welchol (colesevelam HCl) part of your daily routine - Being Active

Make Welchol®
(colesevelam HCl)
part of your daily routine

Fitting exercise and your medication plan into your schedule is an important part of a healthy lifestyle

Working Welchol into your routine, along with diet and exercise, can become a new healthy habit. Visit Welchol.com to learn more about the dosing instructions for Welchol Tablets and Welchol for Oral Suspension.

Learn more about Welchol

Important Safety Information

WHAT IS WELCHOL® (colesevelam HCl)?

Welchol, along with diet and exercise, lowers LDL or “bad” cholesterol. It can be taken alone or with other cholesterol-lowering medications known as statins.

Welchol lowers LDL cholesterol in boys, and in girls who have had a menstrual period, ages 10 to 17 years, with a condition known as heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (a genetic disorder that causes high cholesterol) alone or with other cholesterol-lowering medications known as statins after inadequate control with diet alone.

Welchol, along with diet and exercise, also lowers blood sugar levels in adult patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus when added to other anti-diabetes medications (metformin, sulfonylureas, or insulin).

Welchol should not be used to treat type 1 diabetes or diabetic ketoacidosis.

Welchol has not been studied with all anti-diabetes medications.

Welchol has not been studied in children younger than 10 years old or in girls who have not had a menstrual period.

Important Safety Information About Welchol (colesevelam HCl)

Welchol is available by prescription only. Ask your HCP if Welchol is right for you.

Welchol is not for everyone, especially those with:

  • a history of intestinal blockage,
  • blood triglyceride levels of greater than 500 mg/dL, or
  • a history of pancreatitis (inflammation of the pancreas) due to high triglyceride levels.

Welchol has not been shown to prevent heart disease or heart attacks.

Tell your health care provider (HCP) if you have high triglycerides (greater than 300 mg/dL).

Tell your HCP if you have stomach or intestinal problems, including gastroparesis (when the stomach takes too long to empty its contents), abnormal contractions of the digestive system, a history of major gastrointestinal tract surgery, if you have trouble swallowing, or if you have vitamin A, D, E, or K deficiencies.

Welchol has known interactions with cyclosporine, glimepiride, glipizide, glyburide, levothyroxine, certain birth control pills, olmesartan medoxomil, and metformin extended release (ER). Welchol has not been studied with all combinations of drugs and supplements. Please tell your HCP about all medications and supplements you may be taking before beginning Welchol, as your HCP may tell you to take your other medications and supplements 4 hours before taking Welchol.

Remember to tell your HCP if you are pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or are breastfeeding.

Welchol (colesevelam HCl) for Oral Suspension should not be taken in its dry form.

Welchol for Oral Suspension is recommended for, but not limited to, use in appropriate pediatric patients as well as any patient who has difficulty swallowing.

Phenylketonurics: Welchol for Oral Suspension contains 27 mg phenylalanine per 3.75 gram dose.

In clinical trials, the adverse reactions observed in ≥2% of patients, and more commonly with Welchol than placebo (“sugar pill”), regardless of investigator assessment of causality seen in:

  • Adult patients with high LDL (“bad”) cholesterol were:
    constipation, indigestion, nausea, accidental injury, weakness, sore throat, flu-like symptoms, runny nose, and muscle aches
  • Pediatric patients with high LDL (“bad”) cholesterol were:
    inflamed nasal passages and throat, headache, fatigue, creatine phosphokinase (a muscle enzyme) increase, runny nose, and vomiting
  • Adult patients with Type 2 Diabetes were:
    constipation, low blood sugar (hypoglycemia), indigestion (dyspepsia), nausea, high blood pressure (hypertension), and back pain

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch, or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

For patients having difficulty affording their Daiichi Sankyo medication, please call the Daiichi Sankyo Patient Assistance Program at 1-866-268-7327 for more information or visit www.dsi.com/news/patientassistance.html.

Click here for full Product Information about Welchol.

Staying Motivated Reference

REFERENCES:
1. American Diabetes Association. Blood Glucose Control and Exercise. http://www.diabetes.org/food-and-fitness/fitness/get-started-safely/blood-glucose-control-and-exercise.html. Accessed March 31, 2017.
2. Joslin Disease Center. Why is My Blood Glucose Sometime Low after Physical Activity? http://www.joslin.org/info/why_is_my_blood_glucose_sometimes_low_after_physical_activity.html. Accessed March 31, 2017.

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