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Starting an Exercise Plan

Get tips on starting and sticking with an exercise plan that may help with managing your primary hyperlipidemia and/or type 2 diabetes

Photos depict models, not actual patients or healthcare professionals.

Photos depict models, not actual patients or healthcare professionals.

You probably have lots of excuses

You probably have lots of excuses for not exercising. You don't have the time, the energy, the money—or all of the above. But nothing should stand in the way of a regular exercise routine.

Remember to talk to your healthcare professional before beginning or changing an exercise program.

If you have diabetes, exercise may increase your risk for low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) during or after exercise.1
Speak with your healthcare professional if you experience hypoglycemia.

No more excuses! Fit exercise into your life

No more excuses! Fit exercise into your life

Here are tips on how to fit exercise into your life, so you can keep your fitness program on trackā€”and keep taking steps in the right direction to manage your primary hyperlipidemia and/or type 2 diabetes. Talk to your doctor before starting any exercise program.

Squeeze in 10-minute walks throughout your day. Keep a pair of walking shoes handy, and take a brisk walk whenever you a chance. According to the CDC and the US Department of Health and Human Services Physical Activity Guidelines, short spurts of exercise count.2,3

Take the long way. Park in the back row of the parking lot or in a spot a few blocks away. Skip the elevator and take the stairs.

Consult with your healthcare professional if this exercise regimen is right for you.

Rethink your routine. That weekly matinee with your best friend could be reborn as a weekly bike ride or trip to the pool. You'd still enjoy each other's company, but you'd have a "healthier" relationship.

Be ready to go. Make sure your exercise equipment is handy. Leave your workout clothes on top of your dresser and keep a full water bottle in the fridge.

Wake up earlier. If your schedule is always jam-packed, get up 30 minutes earlier twice a week to hop on that treadmill or walk around the block. It might be hard at first, but the benefits will keep you motivated. Once you've gotten used to early-morning workouts, add another day or two to your routine.

Go to sleep earlier. People who are tired tend not to exercise. Go to bed early to make sure you're getting enough rest. You may even get the sleep you need for that early morning workout.

Exercise at home. You don't need a gym membership to get a great workout. Use inexpensive resistance bands or heavy objects in place of weights. Do push-ups, sit-ups, or squats. Try exercise videos on dance aerobics, yoga, or tai chi.

 

Consult with your doctor before choosing a goal weight and starting a new exercise program.
If you have diabetes, exercise may increase your risk for low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) during or after exercise.1 Speak with your healthcare professional if you experience hypoglycemia.

Make Welchol (colesevelam HCl) part of your daily routine - Being Active

Make Welchol®
(colesevelam HCl)
part of your daily routine

Fitting exercise and your medication plan into your schedule is an important part of a healthy lifestyle

Working Welchol into your routine, along with diet and exercise, can become a new healthy habit. Visit Welchol.com to learn more about the dosing instructions for Welchol Tablets and Welchol for Oral Suspension.

Learn more about Welchol

Important Safety Information

WHAT IS WELCHOL® (colesevelam HCl)?

Welchol, along with diet and exercise, lowers LDL or “bad” cholesterol. It can be taken alone or with other cholesterol-lowering medications known as statins.

Welchol lowers LDL cholesterol in boys, and in girls who have had a menstrual period, ages 10 to 17 years, with a condition known as heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (a genetic disorder that causes high cholesterol) alone or with other cholesterol-lowering medications known as statins after inadequate control with diet alone.

Welchol, along with diet and exercise, also lowers blood sugar levels in adult patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus when added to other anti-diabetes medications (metformin, sulfonylureas, or insulin).

Welchol should not be used to treat type 1 diabetes or diabetic ketoacidosis.

Welchol has not been studied with all anti-diabetes medications.

Welchol has not been studied in children younger than 10 years old or in girls who have not had a menstrual period.

Important Safety Information About Welchol (colesevelam HCl)

Welchol is available by prescription only. Ask your HCP if Welchol is right for you.

Welchol is not for everyone, especially those with:

  • a history of intestinal blockage,
  • blood triglyceride levels of greater than 500 mg/dL, or
  • a history of pancreatitis (inflammation of the pancreas) due to high triglyceride levels.

Welchol has not been shown to prevent heart disease or heart attacks.

Tell your health care provider (HCP) if you have high triglycerides (greater than 300 mg/dL).

Tell your HCP if you have stomach or intestinal problems, including gastroparesis (when the stomach takes too long to empty its contents), abnormal contractions of the digestive system, a history of major gastrointestinal tract surgery, if you have trouble swallowing, or if you have vitamin A, D, E, or K deficiencies.

Welchol has known interactions with cyclosporine, glimepiride, glipizide, glyburide, levothyroxine, certain birth control pills, olmesartan medoxomil, and metformin extended release (ER). Welchol has not been studied with all combinations of drugs and supplements. Please tell your HCP about all medications and supplements you may be taking before beginning Welchol, as your HCP may tell you to take your other medications and supplements 4 hours before taking Welchol.

Remember to tell your HCP if you are pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or are breastfeeding.

Welchol (colesevelam HCl) for Oral Suspension should not be taken in its dry form.

Welchol for Oral Suspension is recommended for, but not limited to, use in appropriate pediatric patients as well as any patient who has difficulty swallowing.

Phenylketonurics: Welchol for Oral Suspension contains 27 mg phenylalanine per 3.75 gram dose.

In clinical trials, the adverse reactions observed in ≥2% of patients, and more commonly with Welchol than placebo (“sugar pill”), regardless of investigator assessment of causality seen in:

  • Adult patients with high LDL (“bad”) cholesterol were:
    constipation, indigestion, nausea, accidental injury, weakness, sore throat, flu-like symptoms, runny nose, and muscle aches
  • Pediatric patients with high LDL (“bad”) cholesterol were:
    inflamed nasal passages and throat, headache, fatigue, creatine phosphokinase (a muscle enzyme) increase, runny nose, and vomiting
  • Adult patients with Type 2 Diabetes were:
    constipation, low blood sugar (hypoglycemia), indigestion (dyspepsia), nausea, high blood pressure (hypertension), and back pain

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch, or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

For patients having difficulty affording their Daiichi Sankyo medication, please call the Daiichi Sankyo Patient Assistance Program at 1-866-268-7327 for more information or visit www.dsi.com/news/patientassistance.html.

Click here for full Product Information about Welchol.

Starting Routine Reference

REFERENCES:
1. American Diabetes Association. Blood Glucose Control and Exercise. http://www.diabetes.org/food-and-fitness/fitness/get-started-safely/blood-glucose-control-and-exercise.html. Accessed March 31, 2017.
2. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). How Much Physical Activity Do Adults Need? https://www.cdc.gov/physicalactivity/basics/adults/index.htm. Accessed March 31, 2017.
3. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Physical Activity Guidelines Advisory Committee Report, 2008. https://health.gov/paguidelines/report/pdf/CommitteeReport.pdf. Accessed March 31, 2017.

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